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Open Educational Resources

Defining Open Access

According to David Wiley of Lumen Learning, open content refers to "any copyrightable work (traditionally excluding software, which is described by other times like "open source") that is licensed in a manner that provides users with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities:

1. Retain - the right to make, own, and control copies of the content (e.g., download, duplicate, store, and manage)

2. Reuse - the right to use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video)

3. Revise - the right the adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)

4. Remix - the right to combine the original or revised content with other open content to create something new (e.g. incorporate the content into a mashup)

5. Redistribute - the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g. give a copy of the content to a friend)

Defining Creative Commons

creative commons is a "some rights reserved" license that allows a copyright holder to grant permission to others to use the work while maintaining the rights to their work (so they still get credit for it). There are different levels of creative commons licenses, but in some cases, this allows a work to be changed and republished under the same license.

 

Imagine is a port of Creative Commons: Free Photos for Bloggers by foter.com Image is licensed CC-BY-SA

 

Feedback from JWU Faculty

TC Rogers, Professor, College of Online Education

"I am asked to redesign all course by using electronic resources and not focus on one textbook, if possible.  Students are commonly so technologically driven that they  appreciate having multiple technological resources to learn form and refer to, and they appreciate not being required to purchase a book. Also, the challenge of building a course without one textbook lends to providing student many types of learning tools (i.e. articles, articulate presentations, videos, interactive software). I worked with Kelly (the librarian) throughout one term’s time to outline needed resources, communicate with her about the material that I was seeking and to build the course. I am in my second course redesign and building of course without a textbook. Depending on how much help is being asked of the librarians at once, affects how long it takes for the electronic sources to be found and provided – usually between 1 and 3 weeks. I am extremely grateful for Kelly’s assistance. I felt like she really partnered with me in building the course. She often offered additional help, such as pasting the sources right into the shell and building a database of resources inside the course for the students to access. The overall feedback from students about the redesigned course, in comparison to the feedback about the previously used course design that focused on a textbook, was extremely favorable."